“I realize that the odds against a free life must seem pretty formidable right now. And yet there are already individuals who live their lives as they choose.
~Harry Browne

By Catherine Austin Fitts

Jon Rappoport, Dr. Joseph Farrell and I shared the stage in San Mateo in July. Questions we heard throughout the weekend included, “How do I breakaway?” “How can I be happy given the way the world is going.” How do I help my children adapt and thrive?”  Jon addressed some of these questions in his presentation. However, the audience wanted more – lots more. They wanted to drill down into the details.

For the last two months Jon, Joseph and I have been discussing the tactics and strategies that people have used – both now and through the centuries – to overcome the spiritual, cultural, legal, financial and physical obstacles to personal freedom. We thought we would share some of these insights this week on the Solari Report.

In Money & Markets this week I will discuss the latest in financial and geopolitical news. Make sure to send your questions for Ask Catherine.

In Let’s Go to the Movies, I will review “Long Way Round”. When a colleague suggested I watch 5 1/2 hours of Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman riding motorcycles from London to New York via Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Siberia, Russia and Canada, I thought he was mad.  Yes, I loved having motorcycles when I lived in Hong Kong. Yes, I rode a bicycle alone across the United States. These are things that are fun to do, not watch a video of someone else doing. I was sure I would never get through the first episode. Wrong I was – tagging along by film on this extraordinary adventure, infused me with new energy for living a free and inspired life.

Talk to you Thursday!

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By Catherine Austin Fitts

The latest Gallup poll is in and it is not good news for incumbents running in the mid-term elections. One in four Americans, 23%, are satisfied with how things are going – 76% are dissatisfied. This is one of the reasons we are seeing new, fresh candidates doing better than expected – we are approaching a level of transformational shifts in the body politic. That number is 80% – that is when you get a super majority and unexpected things start to happen.

Four percent more to go. Hold on to your hats!

No Change in U.S. Mood: 23% Satisfied, 76% Not

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By Jeff Kearns and Steve Matthews

The Federal Reserve maintained a commitment to keep interest rates near zero for a “considerable time” after asset purchases are completed, saying the economy is expanding at a moderate pace and inflation is below its goal.

“The labor market has yet to fully recover,” Fed Chair Janet Yellen said at a press conference after a meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee today in Washington. “There are still too many people who want jobs but can’t find them.” She added that “inflation has been running below the committee’s 2 percent objective.” In July, the Fed said inflation was “somewhat closer” to its goal.

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By Ami Sedghi and George Arnett

To what extent, if at all, do you feel that your generation will have had a better or worse life than your parents’ generation? That’s the question a new Ipsos Mori survey has asked, which finds that young people in the west are particularly pessimistic about their future.

Shiv Malik writes today:

Adults in parts of the developing world are far more optimistic than their counterparts in rich nations, where the majority feel that young people will live a worse life than current generations, according to a major new survey.

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By Catherine Austin Fitts

I have been reading the autobiographies of political and business leaders reaching the apex of their careers. I have downloaded more to read but am finding it slow going. Occasionally I will review them on the blog. For a recent example, see Dick Cheney’s “Fluffernutter”.

Sometimes I read them as their descriptions of the “official story” gives me a nugget that unlocks profoundly important insights about the details of our recent financial coup d’etat and the direction that reinvestment is intended to go. Sometimes I read them to see what they leave out – and what it says about who and what they fear and what that implies about the various investment syndicates.

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Link to YouTube

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(Photo Credit: Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters)

By CBC News

Russia will create a multi-billion dollar anti-crisis fund in 2015 of money destined for the Pension Fund and some left over in this year’s budget to help companies hit by sanctions, Finance Minister Anton Siluanov was quoted as saying on Monday.

Several waves of Western sanctions against Moscow for its involvement in the Ukraine crisis have limited access to foreign capital for Russia’s largest banks and key oil companies.

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By Buttonwood

What are the likely long-term returns from various asset classes, based on the most probable economic outlook and the past record of valuations and returns? These are the essential questions for investors and cannot, of course, be answered definitively; we can only make assumptions on our interpretation of the evidence. But there can be few better starting points than Deutsche Bank’s long-term asset return study, put together by Jim Reid and his team. (Alas, it’s a research note sent to clients so no link is available.) It covers a wide range of issues from secular stagnation to a survey of geopolitical risk going back to Alexander the Great (which I hope to return to in another post).

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By DrinkerBiddle

On September 9, 2014, the Division of Swap Dealer and Intermediary Oversight of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) issued an exemptive letter (the JOBS Act Exemptive Letter) for private fund managers relying on exemptions from registration as commodity pool operators (CPOs) with the CFTC. This relief harmonizes the CFTC’s CPO exemptions with the 2013 final rules issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) relating to offerings exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act) as required by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (JOBS Act).

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Related Reading:

Sam Cooke on Wikipedia

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