By CB Parrish

I just got done listening to the three of you talking about the pink elephant event and, once again, I’m mowed down by it. This mowed down thing: It’s not like a roadrunner cartoon. It’s how my whole up/out here gets mowed into my whole down/in here, shoving me into my inner cosmos, flying around in it, when I listen to you.

I try to do as much of my buying as possible through Etsy, so I can be helping my fellows instead of enriching the guys who are gunning for me. There’s a lady in Oklahoma who makes pins out of flip top lids… generally makes art out of stuff that would otherwise, mostly, end up in the recycling bin. She’s SO cool, I try to get little talismans from her for marking events or feelings or attitudes.

She made me this out of a baby food can lid. Realizing that putting wings on me with a pink elephant and the word was going to be too much for one pin, I just asked her to put wings on the elephant. But the WHOLE truth is my wings have been misplaced, and sorely missed, for a long time. I catch a glimpse of them from time to time, but never seem to get through the piles of accumulated disappointment to them.

I know it’s like looking everywhere for your glasses when the whole time they’re just shoved up on your head, but each time I hear or see any, or all three, of you, I find my wings again, right where they’ve always been.

XOXOXOXOXOX

Love, nines

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hungryholler: Gourd Art and Mirror Mosaic Art With A Difference

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By Robert Barr

Who won and who lost in Scotland’s independence referendum?

WINNERS: The 55.3 percent of Scottish voters who wanted to stay in the United Kingdom.

LOSERS: The 44.7 percent who disagreed.

WINNER: Gordon Brown. The former prime minister broke out of what seemed to be a long sulk since losing the 2010 election, and delivered a barnstorming defense of the United Kingdom which gave the No campaign some badly needed energy in the final days.

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Scottish Independence: Guide to Scotland Referendum Night

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By Catherine Austin Fitts

When central banks and governments print and borrow money without limit, and use that money to engineer wild discrepancies in cost of capital, a very perverse culture and economic practices are a fait accompli. Add to that a hidden system of finance and black budget run by insiders with the ability to kill with impunity and act above the law, and pretty soon you are going to create a system that operates as ours does.

Unfortunately, the author of Unaccountable, Janine Wedel, an anthropologist who teaches at George Mason, is not schooled in finance and economics, let alone in the covert side of life. The result is a book that has some interesting stories but skates on the surface of things and proposes solutions that will make things worse. Trying harder and writing more rules is the equivalent of suggesting – as the water rises in the boat that has sprung a major leak – that we hand out more spoons for passengers to shift water overboard.

If you want more stories about US corruption, you will find them here. If you want insights about what is really happening and why, this one is not for you. Financial and economic literacy is a must if you want to navigate your world. Unaccountable is another example of why you do not want to proceed without it.

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(Photo Credit: Reuters)

By Justin Huggler, Berlin

A reward of $30m has been offered for conclusive evidence on who shot down Flight MH17 – but the identity of the person or organisation behind the offer is a mystery.

The sum is larger than the $25m the US offered for information on the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, and is thought to be one of the largest bounties in history.

It is being offered through a German private investigation agency that says even it doesn’t not know who its anonymous client is.

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Malaysian Flight MH17 crash analysis, by The Russian Union of Engineers

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(Translation from original article)

By Manlio Dinucci

Faced with the “unprecedented Ebola, which spreads exponentially epidemic in West Africa,” President Obama announced that “at the request of the Liberian government,” the United States will establish “a military command center in Liberia “. This is a “command headquarters of the joint force” specifies the Africa Command of the United States (including the “area of responsibility” covers the entire continent except Egypt). The headquarters, under General Darryl Williams (already on the ground in Liberia) will have at least 3,000 military Americans, an airlift and a sorting center in Senegal. It is this headquarters will perform the function of “command and control” of the international operation anti-Ebola, which aims to send medical personnel and hospitals. According to Obama, it is “an example of what happens when America takes leadership to confront the world’s greatest challenges.” He listed in his recent speech urbi et orbi, claiming that only the United States has “the capacity and will to mobilize the world against the terrorists of Isis” and “beat the worldwide recall against Russian aggression , “and” contain and destroy the Ebola “epidemic.

Although the possibility that Ebola spreads in the United States is extremely low, said Obama in his speech at the Center for Control and Prevention of Diseases [1] in Atlanta (Georgia), in West Africa it caused the deaths of “more than 2,400 men, women and children.” Event certainly tragic, but limited if it is related to the fact that West Africa has a population of about 350 million and the entire sub-Saharan region almost 950 million. If you think die every year in the region due to AIDS over a million adults and children; that causes malaria each year more than 600,000 deaths, mostly among African children; that in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia diarrhea annually kills about 600,000 children (over 1,600 per day) less than five years. These diseases and others, all “diseases of poverty”, which cause each year in sub-Saharan Africa millions of premature deaths and disability cases are due to undernourishment and malnutrition, lack of drinking water, poor hygiene and sanitary living conditions of the poor, who (according to data from the World Bank itself) constitutes 70% of the total population, 49% is in conditions of extreme poverty. Obama’s campaign against Ebola seems instrumental.

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By Kyle Caldwell

Buy low, sell high. It is a simple formula for investment success, but with so many ways to measure a market, and with conflicting results, following it can be difficult.

To help, we today highlight three closely watched valuation measures, and others that are growing in popularity.

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By Catherine Austin Fitts

The latest Gallup poll is in and it is not good news for incumbents running in the mid-term elections. One in four Americans, 23%, are satisfied with how things are going – 76% are dissatisfied. This is one of the reasons we are seeing new, fresh candidates doing better than expected – we are approaching a level of transformational shifts in the body politic. That number is 80% – that is when you get a super majority and unexpected things start to happen.

Four percent more to go. Hold on to your hats!

No Change in U.S. Mood: 23% Satisfied, 76% Not

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By Jeff Kearns and Steve Matthews

The Federal Reserve maintained a commitment to keep interest rates near zero for a “considerable time” after asset purchases are completed, saying the economy is expanding at a moderate pace and inflation is below its goal.

“The labor market has yet to fully recover,” Fed Chair Janet Yellen said at a press conference after a meeting of the Federal Open Market Committee today in Washington. “There are still too many people who want jobs but can’t find them.” She added that “inflation has been running below the committee’s 2 percent objective.” In July, the Fed said inflation was “somewhat closer” to its goal.

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By Ami Sedghi and George Arnett

To what extent, if at all, do you feel that your generation will have had a better or worse life than your parents’ generation? That’s the question a new Ipsos Mori survey has asked, which finds that young people in the west are particularly pessimistic about their future.

Shiv Malik writes today:

Adults in parts of the developing world are far more optimistic than their counterparts in rich nations, where the majority feel that young people will live a worse life than current generations, according to a major new survey.

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