We Apologize

By Catherine Austin Fitts

We apologize!

You may have noticed that we have been managing repeated Denial of Service and hack attacks. They have been quite fierce this year – coming from many different places both in the United States and around the world.

I can only conclude that we are indeed bringing you “the truth and nothing but the truth.” The long-term solution is our new website which we intend to launch this summer. We believe it will be much harder to hack. The short-term solution is to continue to do the many things our systems team is doing to make the site as invulnerable as possible.

I would like to compliment our systems and operations team – they are doing a great job up against a syndicate which has clearly invested significant resources to defend their market share.

You deserve the very best service – we are working hard to make sure that your service is interrupted as little as possible.  We thank you for your understanding, your suggestions and your support!

Here is an idea if you would like to help:

We believe that the post which triggered the latest round of attacks was my comment on the Pope’s Encyclical. So, we would be delighted if you would click on the following link, copy the content and e-mail this article far and wide. Let’s make it difficult for resource-rich institutions to censor via cybercrimes.

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By Wikileaks

Today, 1500 CEST Wednesday, 1 July 2015, WikiLeaks releases a modern journalistic holy grail: the secret Core Text for the largest ‘trade deal’ in history, the TiSA (Trade In Services Agreement), whose 52 nations together comprise two-thirds of global GDP. The negotiating parties are the United States, the 28 members of the European Union and 23 other countries, including Turkey, Mexico, Canada, Australia, Pakistan, Taiwan and Israel.

Today’s publication happens the week before the next TiSA negotiating round that begins on Monday, 6 July. WikiLeaks is also today publishing the full agenda for next week’s negotiations, which shows that discussions will focus on Financial Services, Telecommunications and the Movement of Natural Persons.

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By Thom Feeney

All this dithering over Greece is getting boring. European ministers flexing their muscles and posturing over whether they can help the Greek people of not. Why don’t we the people just sort it instead?

The European Union is home to 503 million people, if we all just chip in a few Euro then we can get Greece sorted and hopefully get them back on track soon. Easy.

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“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.”
~ Charles Dickens

By Catherine Austin Fitts

Subscribers have read and heard a lot on the Solari Report over the last two years about the coming turn in the bond market. So it is not a surprise that it is finally here. The Fed continues to jawbone about raising interest rates. However, at some point they are going to really raise them. When this happens, the divergence between those who can print dollars and those who cannot print dollars (but have borrowed quite a lot of them) will grow.

I worked on Wall Street during a bond bear market. Most people in financial markets have only lived through one really bad patch – the bailout period. They don’t really know what a bear bond market is like. The thirty-five year bull market in bonds financed a lot of centralization and piled up trillions into the interest rate swap derivatives market. Which makes rising interest rates a whole new experience.

Add to the unusual circumstances the significant downsizing of staff and inventory by large financial institutions after the passage of Dodd Frank. To get a sense of the tensions in the bond market, see my Solari Report, The Meaning of Negative Interest Rates with Don Coxe or my commentaries, The Race to Call the Top and A Compliment to PIMCO’s New Leadership.

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