“In our society, growing food yourself has become the most radical of acts. It is truly the only effective protest, one that can-and will-overturn the corporate powers that be. By the process of directly working in harmony with nature, we do the one thing most essential to change the world-we change ourselves!” ~ Jules Dervaes

By Catherine Austin Fitts

This week on the Solari Report, Harry Blazer is speaking with Anais Dervaes of Urban Homestead as the Dervaes family announces the launch of its new podcast series on June 13th.  We have featured the work of the Dervaes family before with its documentary short Homegrown Revolution:

One thing you heard in our latest Solari Report on EMF radiation is to get your feet on some dirt, your face in the sun, and your mind and body closer to nature. Here is an opportunity to do so – and to address the challenge of falling food quality and rising food prices. The Urban Homestead podcasts and workshops are designed to inspire and help you get started.

For those of us who don’t have the time or knack for gardening, the Urban Homestead story and resources are an inspiration for rebuilding our local food providers with our purchases – to shop at our local farmers markets or direct from local farms and CSAs, and to support restaurants and grocery stores that do. We can encourage our local hospitals and governments to do the same with institutional and school purchases. We can encourage our local bank or credit union to be supportive of rebuilding local food sources.

In Money & Markets this week I will be speaking to you from Sydney, Australia and will discuss the latest in financial and geopolitical news, including America’s withdrawal from the Paris Accord. Make sure to post or e-mail your questions for Ask Catherine.

In Let’s Go to the Movies, I recommend American Epic a superb three part series narrated by Robert Redford and published by PBS.

PBS describes:

“In the 1920s, as radio took over the pop music business, record companies were forced to leave their studios in major cities in search of new styles and markets. Ranging the mountains, prairies, rural villages, and urban ghettos of America, they discovered a wealth of unexpected talent. The recordings they made of all the ethnic groups of America democratized the nation and gave a voice to everyone. Country singers in the Appalachians, Blues guitarists in the Mississippi Delta, Gospel preachers across the south, Cajun fiddlers in Louisiana, Tejano groups from the Texas Mexico border, Native American drummers in Arizona, and Hawaiian musicians were all recorded. For the first time, a woman picking cotton in Mississippi, a coal miner in Virginia or a tobacco farmer in Tennessee could have their thoughts and feelings heard on records played in living rooms across the country. It was the first time America heard itself.”

American Epic is a joyous reminder of the talent and power which exists within us  – we find it when we listen to each other. Congratulations to an all-star cast of producers, directors and artists for a decade long commitment to capture and document this untold story.

Talk to you Thursday!

The Solari Food Series:

Introducing the Solari Food Series

Vital Soils, The Foundation of Life, Part I

Pioneering Urban Farms with Will Allen

Vital Soils, the Foundation of Life, Part II

The Future of Biodynamic and Organic Farming

Francois Vecchio – Charcutier, Salumiere, Wurstmeister

A Culinary History of Christmas

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